Gastric Sleeve Surgery: How the Stomach Is Removed

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Introduction: Gastric Sleeve Surgery: How the Stomach is Removed

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the removal of a portion of the stomach to reduce its size and capacity, resulting in weight loss. The surgery is performed using keyhole incisions, or laparoscopic surgery, with the aid of trocars, which are small tubes used to create access ports for special surgical instruments.

During the procedure, a stapler is used to divide the stomach and remove a section of it, leaving behind a narrow tube, or "sleeve." This reduces the stomach's capacity and thus limits the amount of food a person can eat, leading to weight loss.

Performing sleeve gastrectomy via keyhole incisions offers several benefits, including reduced scarring and shorter recovery time compared to traditional open surgery.

The smaller incisions result in less post-operative pain and a lower risk of complications, allowing patients to return to their normal activities sooner. Additionally, keyhole surgery generally leads to improved cosmetic results, with smaller, less noticeable scars.

In summary, gastric sleeve surgery involves the removal of a portion of the stomach using keyhole incisions, trocars, and a stapler, resulting in reduced scarring and faster recovery compared to traditional open surgery.

Gastric Sleeve Surgeon LA

What is gastric sleeve surgery?

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a surgical procedure to help with weight loss by reducing the size of the stomach. During the surgery, a large portion of the stomach is removed, creating a smaller, sleeve-shaped stomach. This limits the amount of food a person can eat, resulting in a feeling of fullness sooner and ultimately leading to reduced calorie intake and weight loss.

This surgery is typically recommended for individuals with a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher, or a BMI of 35 or higher with obesity-related health conditions. The procedure can also be an option for those who have not had success with other weight loss methods.

Benefits of gastric sleeve surgery can include significant weight loss, improvement or remission of obesity-related conditions such as type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and sleep apnea, and overall improvement in quality of life.

However, as with any surgical procedure, there are potential risks and complications, including infection, blood clots, and leaking at the surgical site. Patients can expect to see weight loss and improvement in health conditions over time, with proper adherence to post-surgery dietary and lifestyle guidelines.

Overall, gastric sleeve surgery can provide significant health benefits for eligible individuals seeking to achieve weight loss and improve their overall well-being.

What does a gastric sleeve do?

A gastric sleeve, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a surgical procedure designed to help individuals with severe obesity lose weight by reducing the size of their stomach. During the surgery, a large portion of the stomach is removed, leaving a smaller, banana-shaped "sleeve" that can hold significantly less food. This reduction in stomach size leads to a feeling of fullness with less food, aiding in weight loss.

In addition to reducing stomach size, the gastric sleeve surgery also helps decrease the production of hunger hormones, such as ghrelin, which leads to a decreased appetite. By reducing the amount of food that can be consumed and decreasing hunger, the gastric sleeve surgery can help individuals achieve significant and sustained weight loss. Furthermore, the surgery has been shown to improve metabolism and increase insulin sensitivity.

While the gastric sleeve surgery offers numerous benefits in terms of weight loss and improved health, it also carries certain risks. These can include infection, blood clots, and potential complications from anesthesia. Additionally, individuals who undergo the surgery will need to make significant lifestyle changes, including adjusting their diet and incorporating regular exercise, in order to achieve the best results.

Overall, the gastric sleeve surgery can be an effective option for those struggling with severe obesity, but it's essential to carefully consider the potential risks and restrictions associated with the procedure.

How common is gastric sleeve surgery?

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, has become increasingly prevalent in recent years as a popular option for weight loss. In the United States, approximately 165,000 gastric sleeve surgeries are performed annually, making it the most common weight loss surgery in the country. Worldwide, the number of gastric sleeve surgeries performed each year is estimated to be around 340,000.

Despite its popularity, only a small percentage of eligible individuals actually undergo gastric sleeve surgery. It is estimated that less than 1% of eligible patients undergo bariatric surgery, including gastric sleeve, which suggests that there is significant room for growth in the utilization of this procedure as a weight loss solution.

In the realm of bariatric surgeries, sleeve gastrectomies account for approximately 60% of all procedures performed, making it the most prevalent type of weight loss surgery both in the U.S.

and worldwide. The prevalence of gastric sleeve surgery as a weight loss solution continues to rise, reflecting its effectiveness and success rate in helping individuals achieve significant and sustainable weight loss.

Is the gastric sleeve safe?

Gastric sleeve surgery is generally considered safe, but like any surgical procedure, it does come with some risks. Potential complications of gastric sleeve surgery include infections, blood clots, leaks from the surgical site, and nutritional deficiencies. However, compared to other more invasive weight loss surgeries, such as gastric bypass, gastric sleeve surgery typically has a lower risk of complications.

One of the key benefits of gastric sleeve surgery is that it is a minimally invasive procedure, meaning it involves smaller incisions and less trauma to the body. This can result in a faster recovery time, less pain, and reduced risk of post-operative complications.

Additionally, gastric sleeve surgery has been shown to effectively help patients lose weight and improve obesity-related health conditions, such as diabetes and high blood pressure.

Overall, while gastric sleeve surgery does carry some risks, the benefits often outweigh the potential complications.

Minimally invasive surgical techniques have improved the safety and effectiveness of the procedure, making it a viable option for individuals seeking long-term weight loss and improved health.

What qualifies you for gastric sleeve surgery?

To qualify for gastric sleeve surgery, individuals typically need to have a body mass index (BMI) of 40 or higher, or a BMI of 35 or higher with obesity-related health conditions such as hypertension or type 2 diabetes. Previous attempts at weight loss through diet and exercise are often required, as well as participation in a medically supervised weight loss plan for a certain period of time.

Candidates must also demonstrate mental and physical readiness for the surgery and recovery process, including the ability to adhere to post-operative dietary and lifestyle changes.

Before undergoing gastric sleeve surgery, individuals will need to undergo counseling and screening with a team of medical specialists, which may include a bariatric surgeon, dietitian, psychologist, and other healthcare professionals. This process helps ensure that potential candidates are well-informed about the risks and benefits of the procedure and are mentally prepared for the lifestyle changes that come with it.

Overall, the qualifications for gastric sleeve surgery aim to identify individuals who are most likely to benefit from the procedure and successfully maintain weight loss.

What happens before gastric sleeve surgery?

Before undergoing gastric sleeve surgery, there are several necessary preparations and steps that need to be followed. One of the most important requirements is a two-week liquid diet leading up to the surgery. This diet typically consists of clear broths, protein shakes, and other low-calorie, high-protein liquids. Additionally, patients are often required to fast for a certain period of time before the surgery, typically 12 hours prior to the procedure.

The purpose of the pre-surgery diet and fasting requirements is to empty the stomach and reduce the risk of complications during the surgery. By minimizing the amount of food and liquid in the stomach, the surgeon can have better access to the stomach during the procedure, thus reducing the risk of injury and promoting a smoother surgery.

Surgeons may also provide specific guidelines for the pre-surgery preparations, such as which medications to stop taking before the surgery and what to expect on the day of the procedure. It is crucial to strictly follow these instructions to ensure the best possible outcome.

In conclusion, before gastric sleeve surgery, it is important to adhere to the two-week liquid diet, fasting requirements, and any specific pre-surgery guidelines provided by the surgeon. These preparations and steps are essential for a successful surgery and optimal results.

How is gastric sleeve surgery performed?

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a surgical procedure used to help people lose weight by reducing the size of the stomach. During this procedure, the surgeon removes a large portion of the stomach, creating a new tubular structure that is roughly the size and shape of a banana. This significantly reduces the amount of food the stomach can hold, leading to feelings of fullness with smaller meals.

The surgery is typically performed laparoscopically, meaning small incisions are made in the abdomen and a tiny camera and surgical instruments are used to remove a portion of the stomach. This less invasive approach typically leads to shorter recovery times and less pain for the patient. Overall, gastric sleeve surgery is a popular and effective option for those struggling with obesity and its associated health issues.

What happens during gastric sleeve surgery?

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a procedure that involves the removal of a large portion of the stomach, leaving a small tube-shaped portion behind. The surgery is typically performed under general anaesthetic to ensure the patient remains unconscious and pain-free throughout the procedure.

During the surgery, the surgeon uses a stapling device to create a small tube in the stomach, effectively reducing its size. This is achieved by removing approximately 75-80% of the stomach, leaving behind a narrow vertical sleeve. The stapling device is used to seal and divide the stomach, creating the smaller tube-shaped portion.

After the procedure, the stomach's capacity is significantly reduced, leading to a decrease in the amount of food it can hold. This results in a feeling of fullness after consuming smaller portions of food, ultimately aiding in weight loss. Additionally, the surgery can also impact the production of hunger-inducing hormones, contributing to further weight loss in the long term.

Overall, gastric sleeve surgery is an effective and safe option for individuals struggling with obesity and its associated health issues, often leading to significant weight loss and improved overall health.

Anesthesia and Incision

Gastric sleeve surgery is performed under general anesthesia. The procedure is typically done laparoscopically, which involves making several small incisions in the abdomen. This minimally invasive approach reduces recovery time and lessens the risk of complications.

Creating the Gastric Sleeve

Once the abdomen is accessed, the surgeon uses specialized instruments to work on the stomach. The greater curvature of the stomach is often the site of the incision. A sizing tube is inserted into the stomach to guide the creation of the new stomach size. This tube ensures that the remaining stomach is of the right size and shape to function effectively.

Removing Part of the Stomach

The most critical part of the surgery is the removal of a portion of the stomach. Using surgical staplers, the surgeon divides the stomach longitudinally, creating a narrow sleeve or tube. This step is performed carefully to maintain the blood supply and nerves to the remaining stomach. The removed portion of the stomach, which is the larger part, is then extracted through one of the abdominal incisions.

Ensuring the Integrity of the Sleeve

After the stomach has been divided and the excess portion removed, the surgeon meticulously checks the sleeve for leaks. This is done by introducing a saline solution or a dye into the sleeve while observing for any leakage. The integrity of the staple line is crucial to prevent postoperative complications such as leaks or bleeding.

Closing the Incisions

Once the surgeon is satisfied with the integrity of the gastric sleeve, the abdominal incisions are closed. This is done using sutures or surgical glue. Drains may be placed to prevent fluid accumulation in the operated area.

The Gastric Sleeve procedure

The Gastric Sleeve procedure, also known as Sleeve Gastrectomy, is a popular restrictive weight loss surgery that reduces the size of the stomach, resulting in decreased hunger and increased satiety. During the procedure, the surgeon removes a large portion of the stomach, leaving behind a small sleeve-shaped pouch that can hold only a small amount of food.

The surgery is typically performed using laparoscopic or robotic techniques, which involve making several small incisions in the abdomen to insert a camera and surgical instruments. This minimally invasive approach leads to quicker recovery times and lower risk of complications.

One of the key advantages of the Gastric Sleeve procedure is its effect on hormones and metabolism. The surgery reduces the production of the hunger hormone ghrelin, leading to decreased appetite. Additionally, the preservation of the pyloric valve, which controls the movement of food from the stomach to the small intestine, helps to maintain normal digestion and absorption of nutrients.

Overall, the Gastric Sleeve procedure has proven to be an effective option for individuals struggling with obesity, providing long-term weight loss and improvement in obesity-related conditions such as diabetes and hypertension.

How it Works

Weight loss surgeries, such as gastric band surgery and gastric bypass surgery, work by restricting the amount of food the stomach can hold and/or by altering the digestion process.

Gastric band surgery involves placing a silicone band around the upper part of the stomach, creating a small pouch. This restricts the amount of food that can be consumed at one time. The band can be adjusted over time to control the size of the opening between the pouch and the rest of the stomach.

On the other hand, gastric bypass surgery involves stapling the stomach to create a small pouch and attaching it directly to the small intestine, bypassing a portion of the stomach and the first section of the small intestine. This reduces the amount of food that can be eaten and the absorption of nutrients, as well as altering gut hormone levels, leading to reduced hunger and improved blood sugar control.

The benefits of both surgeries include significant weight loss, reduced hunger, improved blood sugar control, and in some cases, remission of type 2 diabetes. However, gastric bypass often results in more rapid and substantial weight loss compared to gastric band surgery.

Overall, both surgeries can have a positive impact on a patient's health and well-being by not only promoting weight loss but also aiding in the management of obesity-related health conditions.

What happens during gastric sleeve surgery?

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a surgical procedure in which a large portion of the stomach is removed to create a smaller, sleeve-shaped stomach. The surgery is typically performed under general anaesthetic to ensure that the patient is unconscious and pain-free during the procedure.

During the surgery, a stapling device is used to create a small tube or sleeve in the stomach by removing approximately 75-80% of the stomach, including the part that produces the hunger hormone, ghrelin. The remaining portion of the stomach is sealed with surgical staples, leaving a banana-shaped stomach pouch.

After the procedure, the stomach's capacity is significantly reduced, leading to a decreased appetite and a feeling of fullness with smaller meals. The smaller stomach also restricts the amount of food that can be consumed before feeling full, leading to weight loss over time. Additionally, the removal of the portion of the stomach that produces ghrelin can help reduce feelings of hunger.

Gastric sleeve surgery can be a highly effective treatment for individuals struggling with obesity and weight-related health issues. It is important for patients to discuss the potential risks and benefits with their healthcare providers before considering this surgery.

What happens during gastric sleeve surgery?

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, involves the use of a stapling device to reduce the size of the stomach and create a small tube-like structure. The surgeon begins by making several small incisions in the abdomen and inserting a laparoscope, a thin tube with a camera at the end, to visualize the area.

Using the stapling device, the surgeon separates the stomach into two sections and removes the larger portion, leaving behind a small tube-shaped stomach. This significantly reduces the capacity of the stomach, leading to a feeling of fullness with smaller meals.

The surgery is performed under general anaesthetic, which means the patient is asleep and feels no pain during the procedure. After the surgery, the stomach undergoes several changes. The smaller stomach size limits the amount of food that can be consumed, resulting in weight loss.

Additionally, the removal of a portion of the stomach can also lead to changes in the production of hormones that regulate hunger and metabolism, further contributing to weight loss. Overall, gastric sleeve surgery is an effective option for individuals struggling with obesity and related health issues.

The Gastric Sleeve procedure

The Gastric Sleeve procedure, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, is a restrictive weight loss surgery that involves reducing the size of the stomach. This results in decreased hunger and increased feelings of fullness, leading to significant weight loss for patients.

The surgery is typically performed using laparoscopic or robotic techniques, which are minimally invasive and allow for a quicker recovery time. During the procedure, a large portion of the stomach is removed, leaving behind a sleeve-shaped tube. Importantly, the pyloric valve at the bottom of the stomach is preserved, which helps to maintain normal digestion and prevent dumping syndrome.

In addition to the physical restriction of food intake, the Gastric Sleeve surgery also has an impact on hormones and metabolism. The removal of a portion of the stomach can lead to changes in gut hormones that affect appetite and satiety, as well as improvements in insulin sensitivity.

Overall, the Gastric Sleeve procedure is an effective option for those struggling with obesity and its associated health risks. It offers a combination of reduced hunger, smaller food intake capacity, and preserved digestive function, leading to meaningful and sustainable weight loss results.

How long does gastric sleeve surgery take?

Gastric sleeve surgery typically takes around 1-2 hours to complete. The average time can vary depending on factors such as the patient's overall health, the complexity of the procedure, and the experience of the surgical team. Factors such as a patient's body mass index and any underlying health conditions can also affect the length of the surgery.

After the surgery, patients can expect a recovery period of about 1-2 weeks before returning to light activities. The diet progression following gastric sleeve surgery involves a gradual transition from clear liquids to pureed foods and eventually solid foods over the course of several weeks. Patients will receive detailed instructions from their healthcare team about the specific diet plan and nutritional guidelines to follow during the recovery period.

Overall, gastric sleeve surgery typically takes 1-2 hours to complete, and the post-operative recovery and diet progression are essential aspects of ensuring a successful outcome for the patient.

Why gastric sleeve surgery Works?

Gastric sleeve surgery, also known as sleeve gastrectomy, works by reducing the size of the stomach and affecting hunger hormones, resulting in feeling full sooner and for a longer period of time after eating. During the surgery, a large portion of the stomach is removed, leaving a smaller sleeve-shaped portion. This reduces the amount of food the stomach can hold, causing a decrease in the amount of food consumed. Moreover, the surgery also affects the levels of hunger hormones such as ghrelin, which is responsible for stimulating appetite. Post-surgery, the levels of ghrelin decrease, leading to a reduced sensation of hunger.

Physiologically, the smaller stomach size and altered hormone levels contribute to weight loss by reducing the amount of food intake and by affecting appetite. With a smaller stomach, patients feel full sooner, leading to a reduction in food consumption. Additionally, the altered hunger hormone levels decrease the sensation of hunger, leading to a reduced desire to eat. Overall, these physiological changes lead to a decrease in calorie intake and subsequent weight loss.

Gastric sleeve surgery impacts appetite and eating behavior by reducing the sensation of hunger and causing individuals to feel full more quickly. This ultimately leads to changes in eating habits, resulting in improved weight management.

Conclusion: Gastric Sleeve Surgery: How the Stomach is Removed

In conclusion, gastric sleeve surgery involves the key steps of removing a large portion of the stomach to create a smaller sleeve-shaped stomach, thereby restricting the amount of food that can be consumed. This procedure helps with weight loss by reducing the size of the stomach and decreasing the production of hunger-inducing hormones.

Laparoscopic surgery is often the preferred method for gastric sleeve surgery as it involves small incisions and the use of a camera and specialized instruments to perform the procedure. This minimally invasive approach reduces scarring and promotes a faster recovery time for patients.

Different surgical options, such as laparoscopic or robotic surgery, are available for gastric sleeve surgery. The suitability of these options depends on the individual patient's specific needs and medical history. Laparoscopic surgery is generally recommended for most patients due to its minimally invasive nature, while robotic surgery may be suitable for more complex cases.

Overall, gastric sleeve surgery offers an effective solution for weight loss, and the use of laparoscopic techniques and different surgical options allows for a tailored approach to meet the needs of individual patients.

Dr. Babak Moeinolmolki
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